Photo Scoop of The Month (No. 1): Wandering Seville, Spain

Travel Porn - Sevilla, Spain

Travel -Sevilla, Spain

By Regina Winkle-Bryan

I live in the North of Spain, but adore the South for just how different it is from Barcelona. While a love for ‘jamon’ and the good life exists in both regions, these areas are very different culturally. It’s fascinating. Today we have shots of Seville or ‘Sevilla’ if you please, one the Scoopettes’ all time favorite Spanish cities. Can I get an ‘Ole!’?

Sevilla, Spain

Sevilla, Spain

Travel Porn - Sevilla, Spain

Travel- Sevilla, Spain

Travel Porn - Sevilla, Spain

Sevilla, Spain

Travel Porn - Sevilla

Sevilla

Travel Porn - Sevilla

Travel - Sevilla

Travel Porn - Sevilla

Travel - Sevilla

Travel Porn - Sevilla

Sevilla

Have you been to Seville? Tell us about your trip!

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4 Comments

  1. Ian
    Posted August 20, 2013 at 1:35 am | Permalink

    Your photo`s are so nice, i`ll be in Seville 2nd week in September and your photo`s just increase my impatience to get there.

  2. Posted August 20, 2013 at 6:21 am | Permalink

    I actually lived in Seville for 11 years before leaving for northern Spanish climes. I spent my entire time in the famous popular ‘barrio’ of Triana, the old gyspy quarter by the river Guadalquivir that possesses arguably the best townscape view in all Spain. From calle Betis you can take in the dainty looking bullring, the timeless moorish Torre del Oro where the gold and silver from the New World was temporarily stored as well as the majestic Giralda, which is the cathedral’s thousand year old belfry and the city’s most recognisable icon.

    Triana provided ceramics for ancient Rome and is still home to many such producers today. When Laurie Lee came to Seville this was the nieghbourhood where he chose to stay and it is well mentioned in his ‘As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning’ and is probably the most beautifully written memoir of travel in Spain. The old moorings along the riverside is where Sebastian Elcano weighed anchor thereby completing the last stage of Magellan’s circumnavigation of the globe. But I tell a lie referring to the water that flows through Seville as a river, it is in reality a canal. The Guadalquivir, meaning ‘Big River’ in Arabic, flows behind Triana out of touristic sight.

    And much of what Sevillla, as the locals call it, possesses is out of reach of the daytripper. A weekend break in Seville will be a rewarding experience but a stay of a year will be a sublime one; an assault on the senses. There is literally too much to take in over a few days. This is principally due to the inexhaustible number of fiestas that Seville celebrates. There is the famous Semana Santa processions and the equally robust ‘Feria de abril’, which is barely known outside Spanish shores and a fiesta beyond the wildest dreams of any hispanohile. Forget San Fermin, the April Fair is by fair Spain’s most alegre and beautiful fiesta, but you’ll need a few sevillanas dance lessons first. That’s what I did at least.

    Hidden from the typical tourist experience of Andalusia’s capital are the ‘Cruces de mayo’, where, as the name suggests, crosses in May are erected in secluded squares and sangria, sevillanas and flamenco are enjoyed at the weekends. Posters across town announce their arrival and whereabouts.

    As summer approaches the pilgrimmages to El Rocío begin and uninitiated tourists are rudely awoken by a volley of rockets exploding in the early hours announcing the exit of a train of pilgrims on foot, horseback and in ox-pulled wagons. They are heading out of town and down to the picturesque cowboy village of El Rocío, perched on the edge of the Doñana marshland national park. There they will kick up their heels non-stop for 4 days. Is it religion or is it pure merry-making? Only the locals can answer that for you.

    In the intense August heat, Triana holds a modest fiesta along the banks of the ‘river’ in calle Betis and the young men impress onlookers by trying the grab a prize hanging from a greased pole that is in turn perched on the prow of a moored boat.

    I could go on because there are even more festivities to be enjoyed here and this is the essential charm of living in such a city. Your calendar year is full of celebrations to look forward to. Moments of joy and social gathering with food and drink, music and dance. And that is to take nothing away from Christmas here which is also a treat. It is not necessary to run off to Lapland, Father Christmas has much more sherry to enjoy here in the south, a drink far from the reserve of polite church going grannies.

    So, to come to Seville will give up rich rewards but don’t forget that despite the jewels you have experienced, you have both sadly and knowingly barely scratched the surface of what this modest sized city has to offer and has been enjoying for centuries. When they talk about another way of life in Spain, they are in fact referring to Seville.

  3. admin
    Posted August 21, 2013 at 6:25 am | Permalink

    Thanks Ian. We love Seville. September is a good time to visit.

  4. admin
    Posted August 21, 2013 at 6:25 am | Permalink

    Thanks for your thoughtful comment, Mark.

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